The area covered by the Network extends from just east of Ballarat to near Melton. The northern border is the Wombat State Forest and Lerderderg State Park whilst the south extends from near Elaine across the Brisbane Ranges. It is a little over 2,000 square kilometres.   

 

Below is a map showing Landcare and Friends Groups in and around the Moorabool Landcare Network area. Hover over the white pointers to see local Landcare Groups and red pointers for Friends Groups in the area.  

Rainfall

Rainfall varies from around 700mm in the higher areas to less than 500mm east of Bacchus Marsh. Rainfall is closely related to topography with the uplands around 550m above sea level and mountains reaching around 750m, and the lowlands extending down to less than 100m.

Agriculture

A wide range of agriculture is practiced across the Network area, with forestry, potatoes, and dairying in high rainfall areas, and dryland cropping and grazing in the low rainfall areas. Much of the terrain is unsuited to cropping (too steep) and duplex soils - and is used for grazing of sheep and cattle.

The river flats around Bacchus Marsh are extremely fertile and are used for intensive irrigate horticulture.

Around two-thirds of the area of the Network is a declared water catchment, with groundwater and run-off used to supply water for the urban centres of Ballarat, Geelong, Melton, and Bacchus Marsh.  Most of the water in the Werribee River is used for irrigation at Bacchus Marsh and Werribee South.

The agricultural potential of the region is increasingly comprised by ongoing division of rural land into smaller holdings. The Shire of Moorabool has over 4,000 rural holdings. This has implications for land management and full-time land managers find it extremely difficult to co-ordinate activities such as weed and pest control with neighbours who may not even live in the area.

Our Role

The Landcare Network has a vital role in bringing landholders together to address issues of fragmentation of the remnants of native vegetation, infestations of weeds and rabbits, and the ongoing challenge to produce a viable income from rural land to enable reinvestment back into the landscape.

There are two Catchment Management Authorities operating across the Network area, two river authorities, and three water retailers.

The region is yet to establish an identity for its agricultural produce, with the most advanced efforts being;

Amendments to the overview are invited and should be addressed to Roger MacRaild, Landcare Facilitator, at 0459 622 588 or fThis email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it..

 

Map showing Landcare and Friends Groups in and around the Moorabool Landcare Network area. Hover over the white pointers to see local Landcare Groups and red pointers for Friends Groups in the area.